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"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

German Bundesliga

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£130m spend in transfer window

Premier League clubs spent around £130m in the January transfer window, according to analysis by the Sports Business Group at Deloitte. This figure is above the amount spent in January 2013 (£120m), but less than the record level seen in January 2011 (£225m).

The multi-club model

New Charlton Athletic owner Roland Duchatelet owns or has interests in five other football clubs: Standard Liege, FC Brussels and AFC Tubize in Belgium; (through his son) Upjest FC in Hungary; and Carl Zeiss Jena in Germany. He is also said to be eyeing Ad Alcorin in the Spanish second division.

What is the motivation for such a multi-club model? Charlton blogger New York Addick has considered its possible commercial merits:

Cheaper to go to a game in Germany?

Arsenal have a body of French fans who travel over for games by Eurostar. That's not so surprising given that they have a French manager, have had many French players and are conveniently placed for St. Pancras.

It is, however, something of a surprise to learn that Borussia Dortmund can attract as many as a thousand English fans for a top Champions League or Bundesliga game. Dortmund hardly has the attractions of London.

Transfer window breaks all records

Player transfer spending by Premier League clubs in the summer 2013 transfer window was a record, according to analysis by Deloitte. Gross spending totalled £630m, 29% up on the equivalent 2012 figure of £490m and £130m more than the previous record of £500m set in 2008.

In depth critique of the Premier League

David Conn's line on the Premier League is well known: it's a bad thing and the Bundesliga is a good thing.  However, he always argue his case powerfully and this latest piece offers an in depth historical treatment in which he develops his arguments.   It should be of particular interest to Manchester City fans.

German teams need to globalise says Bundesliga boss

Christian Seifert, chief executive of the Bundesliga, says Germany can learn from the Premier League's success in selling commercial and media rights overseas.   The idea of developing club brands gloobally is more developed in England, he believes.

In Germany most club sponsors are German companies.   Mr Seifert told the Financial Times, 'I'm sure we'll see more international-oriented sponsors in the next few years.'   German clubs must become more financially savvy if they were to sustain their success.

Is football a public good?

Is football a 'public good'?  That is the rather surprising claim made by the chief executive of the Bundesliga in an interview with The Guardian's David Conn.  

Is the German model that superior?

The latest conventional wisdom is that the German football model represented by the Bundesliga has established itself as a better one than that of the Premiership.

The first piece of evidence cited for this view is the all-German final in the Champions League and the relatively poor performance of Premiership clubs in the competition.  Methodologically, this is not a sound argument.   It's what is called an individualistic fallacy, generalising from an individual case.

Sky Deutschland hits pay dirt

Its cheap tickets are the toast of the supporters' movement, and lazy commentators are predicting that it will knock the Premiership off its perch, but the Bundesliga is also boosting the profits of Sky Deutschland. Last year they extended their Bundesliga match rights until the 2016-17 season and it's already looking like a good buy.

Would Uefa's FFP rules stand up in court?

We have consistently taken the view that Uefa's financial fair play (FFP) rules are open to challenge in court.    It is therefore interesting to see Belgian lawyer Jean-Louis Dupont, who was part of the team who won the Bosman case in 1995, arguing a similar case in the Wall Street Journal.