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Spanish Leagues

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Spanish football chief arrested

The head of Spain's football federation was arrested yesterday in an investigation into suspected corruption by top officials.

Messi is first £1m a week player

Barcelona are to pay Lionel Messi a basic wage worth more than £1m a week.   Messi's gross salary under a four year contract has been set at an annual €60m (£54.8m).   If the contract runs for its full term Barca are committed to paying him £220m before performance bonuses.

Barcelona had total revenues of €620.2m (£548.6m at current exchange rates) in 2016, the second highest figure in football after Manchester United.  Last season the club budgeted for €695m of income and, according to its own analysis, Messi contributed 20 per cent of that figure.  

TV boosts football club values by €3bn

The combined worth of European football's leading clubs grew by about €3bn over the past year, boosted by the escalating value of broadcasting deals.   According to KPMG, the combined enterprise value of Europe's 32 richest sides was close to €30bn in 2016, a rise of 14 per cent from the previous year.

The list is dominated by Premier League clubs and is topped by Manchester United, which became the first club to be valued at more than €3bn.   Six other English clubs are among the 10 most valuable in Europe.

The financial rewards of the Champions League

Juventus will earn €115m if they win the Champions League (€98m up to now) while Real Madrid will earn €82m (€67m up to now).   Barcelona have earned €59m. These figures come from the author of the Swiss Ramble blog.

In the Premier League, Leicester City earned €78m through their progress to the quarter finals.  Arsenal earned €62m, indicating how much they stand to lose if they do not qualify this year.  Manchester City brought in €48m and Tottenham Hotspur €42m.

The rush to China

Barcelona is the latest European football club to invest in China on the back of President Xi Jinping's plans for a football revolution.  They have opened a €4m complex featuring a football school, Barcelona shop and fan zone on the island of Hainan.  They believe that revenues from China will be critical to Barcelona's target of generating €1bn of revenue by 2021, up from €679m in the 2015/16 season.

Big spending does not always guarantee success

Using a KMPG database, the Financial Times has analysed the accounts of 69 clubs over four seasons. The results reveal that big spending does not always guarantee success.

Premiership clubs make profit in transfer window

Premier League clubs made a net profit of £4m in the transfer window compared with a loss of £109m last year, according to figures from the Premier League. This January's transfer window saw the biggest spend ever of £237m, compared with £178m last year. Sales amounted to £241m.

According to figures from Deloitte Sports Business, the gross spend by Premier League clubs in the 2016/17 season totals £1.4 billion, surpassing the previous record of £1 billion by more than a third.

Global transfers hit record

According to Fifa's Transfer Matching System (TMS), the total spend on transfer fees worldwide was $4.8bn in 2016, a 14.3 per cent increase compared with the previous year and well above inflation.

Since 2010, all clubs are required to record transfer deals through the TMS.  14,951 deals were concluded in 2016, the highest number ever, and about a thousand more than the previous year.

United top money league

The latest edition of the Deloitte Money League has appeared.  Aggregate revenue for the top 20 Money League clubs rose 12% to €7.4 billion (£5.5 billion) in 2015/16, a new record, with three clubs breaking the €600m barrier.   The infographic below shows the evolution of the Money League over the last twenty years.

Super club status a mixed blessing for City

Manchester City have been named as one of nine European super clubs by Uefa.  While the recognition is welcome, it could store up problems for the future.   Uefa may decide to target these clubs with new financial fair play (FFP) measures.