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Spanish Liga

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Uefa may target United and Real debt

Uefa is considering changes in its financial fair play regulations which would target the amount of debt accumulated by clubs.   This would hit Manchester United and Real Madrid in particular.

Funding problems for Spanish clubs

Almeria are having difficulty in funding a new training complex as Spanish banks are reluctant to lend money to clubs because of their high level of debt.

Almeria president Alfonso Garcia also complains about the high level of tax that Spanish clubs have to pay given the extent to which they contribute to Spain's international profile. He is also upset by the way in which the tax authorities chase unpaid debts, but this is hardly surprising given Spain's problems.

'My league's bigger than yours'

Professor Simon Chadwick takes a look at the thorny issue of which is the biggest league in European football.   Although the conclusions are not surprising, the evidence and its appraisal are interesting.

Is football making a break through in the US?

It's a question which has been asked many times before and usually gets a positive but over optimistic answer.   However, the attendance of 109,318 for last night's game between Manchester United and Real Madrid was the biggest ever recorded in the US for a soccer game and was impressive by any standards. Apparently, the fact that the crowd sat on benches helped to cram them in.

Atlético not a model club

Atlético Madrid may look like Davids compared to the Goliaths of Real Madrid, but they have a complex financial history.   Uefa may well see them as far from being a model club given a record of financial recklessness and the regular use of third party signings, something Uefa would like to see stopped.

Their financial model is so complex that Singapore billionaire Peter Lim, who wanted to buy a club n Spain, took one look at Atlético and walked away.   Last week he bought Valencia.

Atletico's success is on shaky foundations

Atletico Madrid have emerged as a third force in Spanish football.  However, there is a history in Spain of clubs emerging to challenge the Real-Barcelona duopoly and then fading as they find it too hot at the top. It seems that Atletico's success is built on shaky financial foundations.

Risk to Nou Camp redevelopment project

Barcelona fans have to vote today on whether they want the project to redevelop the Nou Camp to go ahead.   However, its approval is at some risk after the recent bad publicity enjoyed by the club.

Big blow for Barcelona

Fifa has slapped a 14-month transfer ban on Barcelona for breaking rules relating to the transfer of under-18 players that are designed to protect them from exploitation.   The Catalan club has also been fined, along with the Spanish football federation.

The club's squeaky clean image had already been damaged earlier in the year by allegations of tax evasion surrounding the transfer of Neymar.   The then president resigned, but his successor may now face demands for new presidential elections.

The rich get richer in European football

Critics of the Premier League get a boost when clubs from the English top flight fail to progress.  With the success of Manchester United yesteday evening, two of the eight clubs in the quarter finals are English.  David Conn must have been choking over his cornflakes.

Barcelona deny tax irregularities

Barcelona have denied any tax irregularities in relation to the signing of Neymar. However, in order to safeguard their reputation, they have made a tax declaration of just over €13.5m (£11.1m). However, they insist that the original tax payment was in line with their obligations.