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"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

Spanish Leagues

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Valencia hopeful of brighter future

Singapore billionaire Peter Lim acquired control of Valencia last year.   The club had struggled financially for years with debt increasing faster than income.

His plans remain unclear, but there are hopes of a brighter future.   As the Spanish economy recovers, that should also help.

Spanish clubs face state aid decision

A European Commission investigation into illegal state aids to Spanish football clubs will be concluded by the end of the summer.  Seven clubs are involved, including Barcelona and Real Madrid.

If the allegations are found to be justified, they could face paying back billions of euros.  However, the Spanish government has said it will defend the clubs to the last as they are part of Spain's 'brand'.

Court stops Spanish football strike

A Madrid court issued a last-minute ruling to end a player strike that had threatened to bring the La Liga season to a premature end, as well as preventing the final of the Copa del Ray being played.   According to the interim ruling by Spain's national court, the strike would have caused 'grave organisational disorder'.

There would have been little prospect of playing the cancelled matches at a later date.  Javier Tebas, the president of Spain's professional league, had earlier warned that the stoppage could inflict financial damage of €100m.

Which teams get the big sponsorship money?

There is a lot of detailed and interesting information in this report from Forbes about which clubs get the big sponsorship money and how the picture is changing.

The biggest source of revenue is shirt sponsorship (or jersey sponsorship as this report calls it).   That is followed by stadium naming rights which have become an increasingly lucrative source of revenue.  

Viewers only want to watch bigger teams

A paper published in the International Journal of Economics has claimed that as the money poured into football has grown, the demand from television viewers to watch the bigger teams has increased.   They prefer that to watching matches with uncertain outcomes.

Spanish football to be suspended

Spanish league football is to be suspended from May 16th as a result of a dispute with the government. The Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) is affronted at the small share it would get of pools money and there are also difficulties over legislation on television rights.   However, one interpretation is that it is a move to head off a threatened players' strike.

New style television deal in Spain

Legislation has created a new form of arrangement for the sale of football television rights in Spain frm 2016.   At present clubs negotiate individual deals which has meant that a disproportionate share of revenue has gone to Barcelona and Real Madrid.

Players to wear embedded cameras

Spain's FirstVision has created a shirt to be worn by players with an embedded camera at chest level to provide broadcast standard video.   The device has been tested by players in training sessions at Barcelona and by officials in a match between Barcelona and Real Madrid.   The content was distributed by 150 broadcasters.

Barcelona in best economic position in history

Barcelona president Josep Maria Bartomeou has claimed in an interview with the Financial Times weekend magazine that Barcelona are in the best economic position in their history.   Annual revenues have tripled in a decade to €530m.   Only Real Madrid does better with €604m.

Barca probably have the lowest average ticket prices of any of the top 15 clubs in Europe.  However, after eschewing commercial shirt sponsorships for many years, it is now highly reliant on the €30m a year it gets from its Qatari shirt sponsor.

Did Scudamore score an own goal?

There has been plenty of moral outrage at the amount of money coming into the Premier League under the new television deal and the amount of money being paid to its players.   One political economy blog has already asked me to write a suitably indignant piece which really be a less eloquent rendering of the kind of article that David Conn writes so well in The Guardian.