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"If you want some accessible but informative insight into football then I suggest you couldn't do better than the Political Economy of Football website, which is not only intelligible but comes with the added bonus of being written by Addicks fan Wyn Grant."
Ben Hayes - Charlton Athletic programme

The Championship

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Rams could be hit by parachute payments

Derby County are playing well, if sometimes they are a little too prone to concede goals, and have reasonable expectations of being promoted to the Premier League this season.   Even if they did only survive one season, they would be set up financially for years to come.

Yeung deals Blues a blow from his prison cell

I am sometimes surprised by what it is possible to do from a prison cell if you have the right connections, although, of course, the fact that someone is imprisoned does not deprive them of recourse to the courts, at least not in Hong Kong.

Big losses at Charlton Athletic FC

In many ways Charlton Athletic are typical of many Championship football clubs whose financial problems for at least five years could be solved by just one year in the Premier League. In the meantime, the club continues to make substantial losses of over £7m a year. It is difficult to see how this can be sustained, given that owner Roland Duchatelet thinks that clubs should move to a break even position.

Blues parent company goes into administration

Birmingham City's troubles have gone on for a long time with it being suggested that the club was effectively being controlled from the majority shareholder's prison cell.   It is therefore not a great surprise to learn that the parent company has gone into administration with the various parties seemingly fighting like cats in a sack.

Call to tighten financial controls

Valeri Belokon has called for tighter controls by the Football League on club's finances.  The Latvian was interested in taking over Blackpool, but lost interest after he discovered that £27m had been transferred from club funds to accounts or companies controlled by owner Owen Oyston.

It is not implied that these movements were not lawful, but more transparency about club finances would be welcome.

Championship cash boost from tv deal

Once the overseas deals have been completed, total Premier League broadcasting revenue is expected to exceed £8 billion.   As a result, Championship clubs not receiving parachute payments can expect to receive about £5 million per season in solidarity payments, more than double the present £2.3 million.

With average turnover for clubs in the Championship of about £15 million, the £5 million represents a large proportion of income.   They get about £2 million from their own television deal.   Whether the clubs will regard this as enough is unlikely.

No more Wonga at Blackpool

Wonga is to end its shirt sponsorship at Blackpool after five years.   The Championship strugglers may not find it easy to attract a new sponsor.

The payday lending sector has been hit hard by a tightening of regulations, although, as a market leader Wonga is expected to survive while other firms cease trading.   Its sponsorship of Newcastle United will continue, although its name is being removed from children's kits.

Tuna tycoon takes over Owls

Thai tycoon Dejphon Chansiri has purchased Sheffield Wednesday.   His family controls Thai Union Frozen Products, the world's largest producer of canned tuna and one of the biggest worldwide general seafood producers.   It owns the John West brand in the UK.

The value of the deal was reported to be about £30m.   The club lost £3.7m in the 2012-13 season, which is quite a low figure compared with some Championship clubs, on turnover of £15m,  It had £11m in debt.

A roller coaster ride at Leeds

This article reviews the roller coaster ride that has characterised Massimo Cellino's tenure at Leeds United.   It concedes that Cellino has done some good things for the club.   One also has to assess his period at the helm in the light of the regimes that preceded him and the damage they did to the club.  Few clubs have been so unfortunate in their owners.

More troubles at Birmingham City

What has been described as the 'soap opera' at Birmingham City has taken a new twist.   The club has revealed that £2.55m may have been misappropriated by a former employee from the parent company Birmingham International Holdings Limited.   Shares in the Hong Kong based company were suspended six weeks ago and trading will not be resumed until further notice.