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Southern Premier League

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Hereford United wound up

Hereford United have finally been wound up.   Owner Andy Lonsdale claimed to be on his way to court with proof of the required £1m in funds having been deposited in a bank, but said that he was stuck in traffic.   The judge, clearly exasperated, said that this was not good enough.

Last chance saloon for Hereford

The winding up order against Hereford United has been adjourned once again.   This is the ninth adjournment.   They have until Friday to prove that they have £1m to pay creditors.

Owner Andy Lonsdale has said that it will be 'sorted' by Friday afternoon when the hearing resumes.  That remains to be seen.

Save Hitchin Town

The fight is on to save Hitchin Town, one of three clubs to play in the first FA Cup that is still taking part today.   They are threatened with losing their ground and having to use an out of town site they don't want.

One complication that this report does not make clear is that the ground is owned by a charity (which has a general obligation under charity law to make best use of its assets) while the club is run by a company.

Hereford United suspended

Hereford United have been suspended from 'all football activity' by the Football Association.   the club failed to answer questions in relation to the owners' and directors' test.

The club’s majority shareholder, Alan McCarthy, had been charged with acting as an officer of Hereford United without written confirmation from the FA to do so.

Bulls get another reprieve

The long drawn out saga of Hereford United continues with the hearing of the winding up petition against the club in the High Court deferred again until December 15th.   The petition was originally brought in June by the Inland Revenue in relation to a debt of £116,000.   The legal bills for all these hearings must be mounting.

The woes of Hereford United

Investigative sports journalist David Conn takes an in depth look at the woes of Hereford United.   It doesn't make for happy reading, particularly in terms of the background of the public face of the club, Andrew Lonsdale.   His previous involvement with a non-league club, Feltham FC, apparently involved dumping large quantities of waste on the ground.

Bulls battle on

Hereford United secured another adjournment of a winding up order at the High Court earlier this week.  It was postponed for six weeks until December 1st with the club promising £1.5m in investment.

Herefordshire Council tried to take possession of Edgar Street on Thursday evening, but were thwarted by the assistant manager who was there.   The next day they started proceedings for possession in the county court.   However, the club paid £50,000 in rent and legal fees on Friday afternoon.

Bulls get another reprieve

The long drawn out saga of Hereford United has seen the club given another seven days by the High Court to sort out its financial affairs and pay its debts.  

The club says that new investment is coming in, but the question is whether it is happening quickly enough given that Revenue and Customs want the £170,000 they are owed.   The former management team is also owed money.  It is evident that the patience of the court is wearing thin.

Finding a league sponsor

It's not so easy to find someone to sponsor a league, especially in the non-league system.   The returns are more diffuse than sponsoring a club.   Local businesses are often willing to support a non-league club.  One of their directors may also serve on the club board or their employees may play for the club.

Bulls on the Brink

Hereford United, expelled from the Conference and playing in the Southern Premier League, are once again on the verge of going out of business.

The Bulls tried to agree a Company Voluntary Arrangement with creditors, but there was insufficient support.  In particular, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs, which is owed £170,000, refused to agree. For some time now the tax authorities have lost their patience with football clubs them using them as a free credit card at the expense of other taxpayers.