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What's in a name?

We live in an era in which the brand is everything.   Nothing is more integral to a club's brand than its name.  Name changes occur very rarely, if only because supporters resent them.

There are three main sets of circumstances in which a name change occurs.   One is when a club moves. When Arsenal moved north of the river it no longer made any sense to call them Woolwich Arsenal.  More controversially, when the Wimbledon 'franchise' was acquired for Milton Keynes, the new club took the name MK Dons.  

Could Bath City become next supporter owned club?

Plans are in place for Bath City to become the next supporter owned club.   However, fans need to raise £1.4m to acquire the club, pay off creditors and provide enough working funds for next season.  Former chairman Mandy Rigby is owed £170k.

AFC Fylde's ambition

Yesterday's Non-League Paper carried an advert for a chief executive at AFC Fylde.  On offer is a £50,000 base salary plus car and benefits.  That's a lot of money for a second tier non-league club, but, as the advert states, 'AFC Fylde are a highly ambitious club.'

Success story for Spitfires

There was a record attendance of 4,126 at the Silverlake Stadium, Eastleigh for the visit of Macclesfield Town last Saturday.   The BT cameras were also present for a live screening of the game.  Eastleigh won 4-0 and are just outside the play off places in the Conference.

Phoenix club should soon get keys to Edgar Street

Phoenix club Hereford FC may have to wait a couple of weeks before they get the keys to the Edgar Street ground of former club Hereford United.    They were wound up in December after failing to pay debts of £1m.  Electrical safety tests have to be carried out and there are burst pipes and other issues to be attended to.

Phoenix club should soon get keys to Edgar Street

Phoenix club Hereford FC may have to wait a couple of weeks before they get the keys to the Edgar Street ground of former club Hereford United.    They were wound up in December after failing to pay debts of £1m.  Electrical safety tests have to be carried out and there are burst pipes and other issues to be attended to.

How to balance the books

I have been looking at the accounts for a tier two Conference club.   The shareholders are supporters and the shares are quite widely dispersed, although there are five or so individuals who have larger holdings.

The club reported profits of £52,000 on a turnover of £267,000 in the year ending 30 June.   This compared with £21,000 in the previous twelve months.

Truro revive Football League dream

Truro City consider that their dream of bringing the Football League will come nearer realisation if the local council approves plans for a new £10m 6,000 seater stadium next month.   The stadium would be shared with rugby side Cornish Pirates and local colleges.   574 attended Truro's home game yesterday.

Truro aimed for the Football League under the high spending regime of Kevin Heaney, but ended up in financial trouble and had to be rescued.

Salisbury phoenix club hits problems

The successor club to Salisbury City, Salisbury FC, are facing big problems in their effort to revive non-league football in the cathedral city.   It doesn't look as if they can start playing again next August.

Co-op Bank pull the plug on Lincoln City

Doubt has been cast on the future of Lincoln City after the Co-op Bank said that it would be severing all ties with the club.   The bank has instructed the club to sell its property assets to meet a debt of £380,000. Around 80 per cent of that sum makes up the club's overdraft and working capital facility.

The club's board has spent the last year unsuccessfully purusing alternative financing arrangements.  The club is operating at a loss of £3,000 a week.