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The Premiership

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Olympic Stadium costs rise

The overall bill for the Olympic Stadium is set to soar well beyond £600m before West Ham United move in after it emerged that installing the complex roof would be far more expensive than originally thought.

The complications will not cost West Ham – due to move into the 54,000-seat stadium from the start of the 2016-17 season – another penny on top of the £15m they have pledged towards the conversion.

Will QPR win stadium battle?

Old Oak Common is London's biggest regeneration opportunity since the Olympics. For QPR the question is whether they will be able to build the new stadium there that they see as essential to the future of the club. Their 'New Queens Park' scheme involves building 24,000 homes and it is claimed that it would create 55,000 jobs.

How much cash does Arsenal have to spend?

At last week's annual general meeting Arsenal chief executive Ivan Gazidis insisted that it is 'quite untrue to suggest the club is sitting on a huge cash pile that it is refusing to use.'   He claims that the amount available to spend is much lower than has previously been suggested with a figure of £20m being mentioned.   That would hardly be enough to shore up the defence in the way that most commentators agree is needed.

Do Hull have financial worries?

Most clubs would be pleased with a profit of £9.4m on a turnover of £84.8m.  Indeed, by the standards of football the latest financial results from Hull City represent an exceptional performance.

Admittedly, the figures are for an eleven month period to 30 June so that if one added in July the figure would reduce to £3.3m.   That would be wiped out by the £4m of FA Cup revenue obtained by the finalists.

United to boost commercial income

Manchester United are seeking to boost their already considerable commercial income, forecast to pass the £200m mark this year, by taking full advantage of their new kit contract with adidas.

The contract kicks in next summer and will guarantee United a minimum of £75m annually over the next ten years, three times the base value of the Nike arrangement.   Moreover, the club have negotiated a deal that will allow them to retain the licensing rights to all items apart from signature items such as replica kits and training gear.

Uefa urged not to penalise wealthy benefactors

Uefa have been urged by Manchester City not to penalise wealthy benefactors under their financial fair play (FFP) rules.   The meeting with Uefa president Michel Platini was also attended by Paris Saint Germain who, along with City, have received the heaviest penalties so far under the FFP rules.

Dupont ups financial fair play challenge

Jean Louis-Dupont was the Belgian lawyer who won the Bosman case which transformed football.  More recently, he has been taking on Uefa's financial fair play (FFP) rules.

The argument he is putting forward, which we think has some credence, is that by limiting investment FFP is violating European competition law and that the exemptions Uefa may call upon do not apply.  A range of plaintiffs have joined the action including football agents and the Manchester City supporters club.

West Ham could ground share with Spurs

West Ham might be prepared to allow Tottenham Hotspur to share the Olympic Stadium while White Hart Lane is being redeveloped.   At first it was thought that this would not be possible because the clubs were rivals for the tenancy.

West Ham would not be prepared to share the stadium in their first year there in 2016-17.  However, they might be prepared to allow Spurs to rent the stadium in 2017-18.

A sponsor on your back?

Manchester United are interested in having sponsorship on the back of replica shirts.   At present it is allowed in the FA Cup but not in the Premiership.

However, the other Premier League clubs are opposed to the idea.   They think that there is a risk of diluting the impact of a club's main shirt sponsor.   They also do not want football players to look like Formula One drivers who often have sponsorship logos all over their kit.

Uefa may target United and Real debt

Uefa is considering changes in its financial fair play regulations which would target the amount of debt accumulated by clubs.   This would hit Manchester United and Real Madrid in particular.